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Entries Labeled: Latin (1661)

 

List of entries about Latin


Below you will find specific information on latin, where you may choose a link from the list to get started. In this label about latin : Browse below many Latin legal words and phrases for clear definitions written for you. A free and easy guide to the language of Latin from the dictionary experts at the Lawi Project.

 

Abamare

Concept of "Abamare" Traditional meaning of abamare in English (with some legal use of this latin concept in England and the United States in the XIX Century) [1]: (in Latin) To detect or disclose a crime. Resources Notes and References Based on A Concise Law Dictionary of Words, Phrases [...]

Categories: A. Tags: AB and Latin.



Abatamentum

(Lat. abata/re). An entry by interposition. Co. Litt. 277. An abatement. Yelv. 151. ...

Categories: A, Civil Law, Commercial Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Environmental Law, Family Law, Intellectual Property, International Law, and Labor Law. Tags: AB, Abandonment of Contest, Latin, and Legal History.



Abbrocamentum

Concept of "Abbrocamentum, Abbrochment" Traditional meaning of abbrocamentum, abbrochment in English (with some legal use of this latin concept in England and the United States in the XIX Century) [1]: (in Latin) The forestalling of a market; buying up at wholesale all the goods, to sell at [...]

Categories: A. Tags: AB and Latin.



Abcariare

Concept of "Abcariare" Traditional meaning of abcariare in English (with some legal use of this latin concept in England and the United States in the XIX Century) [1]: (in Latin) To carry away. Resources Notes and References Based on A Concise Law Dictionary of Words, Phrases and Maxims, [...]

Categories: A. Tags: AB and Latin.



Abdite Latet

Concept of "Abdite Latet" Traditional meaning of abdite latet in English (with some legal use of this latin concept in England and the United States in the XIX Century) [1]: (in Latin) He lies hid. Resources Notes and References Based on A Concise Law Dictionary of Words, Phrases and [...]

Categories: A. Tags: AB and Latin.



Abducere

Concept of "Abducere" Traditional meaning of abducere in English (with some legal use of this latin concept in England and the United States in the XIX Century) [1]: (in Latin) To carry away a human being. Abduxit: he carried away. Resources Notes and References Based on A Concise Law [...]

Categories: A. Tags: AB and Latin.



Abigeat

A particular kind of larceny, which is committed not by taking and carrying away the property from one place to another, but by driving a living thing away with an intention of feloniously appropriating the same. ...

Categories: A and Civil Law. Tags: AB and Latin.



Abigeus

(liSit. abigere). One who steals cattle in numbers. This is the common word used to denote a stealer of cattle in large numbers, which latter circumstance distinguishes the abigeus from the /ttr, who was simply a thief. He who steals a single animal may be called fur; he who steals a [...]

Categories: A, Civil Law, and Roman Law. Tags: AB, Latin, and Roman.



Absque

In Latin phrases. A preposition denoting without, or except for. (Lat. without reserving any rent therefrom). A term used of a free grant by the crown. 2 Rolle, Abr. 502. ...

Categories: A. Tags: AB and Latin.



Accapitare

Concept of "Accapitare" Traditional meaning of accapitare in English (with some legal use of this latin concept in England and the United States in the XIX Century) [1]: (in Latin) To do homage to a chief lord on taking a feud. Resources Notes and References Based on A Concise Law [...]

Categories: A. Tags: AC and Latin.



Accapitum

Concept of "Accapitum" Traditional meaning of accapitum in English (with some legal use of this latin concept in England and the United States in the XIX Century) [1]: (in Latin) The relief money payable to a chief lord. Resources Notes and References Based on A Concise Law Dictionary of [...]

Categories: A. Tags: AC and Latin.



Accedas ad curiam

(Lat. that you go to court). In English law. An original writ issuing out of chancery and directed to the sheriff, for the purpose of removing a replevin suit from the hundred court or court baron before one of the superior courts of law. It directs the sheriff to go to the lower court, [...]

Categories: A, Civil Law, Commercial Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Environmental Law, Family Law, Intellectual Property, International Law, and Labor Law. Tags: AC, Latin, and Legal History.



Acceptare

(Lat.) In Old Pleading. To accept. Acceptavit, he accepted. 2 Strange, 817. Non acceptavit, he did not accept. 4 Man. & G. 7. In the Civil Law. To accept; to assent; to assent to a promise made by another. Grotius de Jure Belli, lib. 2, c. 11, § 14. ...

Categories: A and Civil Law. Tags: AC, Acceptance Testing, and Latin.



Acceptilatio

Concept of "Acceptilatio" Traditional meaning of acceptilatio in English (with some legal use of this latin concept in England and the United States in the XIX Century) [1]: (in Latin) Acceptilation; the verbal release of a debt, by declaring it paid when it has not been paid. Resources Notes [...]

Categories: A. Tags: AC and Latin.



Accessio

In Roman law, a method of acquiring property, which includes what would be covered by both accession and accretion in Anglo-American law....

Categories: A and Roman Law. Tags: AC and Latin.



Accrescere

(Lat. to be added to). The term is used is speaking of Islands which are formed in rivers by deposit Calv. Lex.; 3 Kent, Comm. 428. In Scotch Law. To pass to any one. Bell, Diet. It is used in a related sense in the common-law phrase jus accrescendi, the right of survivorship. 1 Washb. [...]

Categories: A. Tags: AC and Latin.



Accusare Nemo se Debet, Nisi Coram Deo

Concept of "Accusare Nemo Se Debet, Nisi Coram Deo" Traditional meaning of accusare nemo se debet, nisi coram deo in English (with some legal use of this latin concept in England and the United States in the XIX Century) [1]: (in Latin) No one is bound to accuse himself, except before God. [...]

Categories: A. Tags: AC and Latin.